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Montgomery Gentry Make Their First Visit To Seacrest Studios

Levine Children's Hospital welcomed Montgomery Gentry as they made their first visit to
Seacrest Studios in Charlotte, NC.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 25 November 2014 15:50

Hits: 13

Montgomery Gentry Talk Battling, Beating Cancer

Courtesy - The Boot

The Boot

The Montgomery Gentry guys are, sadly, no strangers to cancer. But their experiences with the disease have made both Eddie Montgomery and Troy Gentry proponents of regular checkups to aid in early detection.

“Early detection [has a] 100 percent cure rate, so that’s the key,” says Gentry, whose wife Angie was recently diagnosed with breast cancer. She’s currently undergoing chemo, and her prognosis looks good, but Gentry tells The Boot that, no matter the stage, a cancer diagnosis is a lot to handle.

“It’s devastating just to hear the word cancer,” he says, “but with today’s technologies, medicines, all that, and having the support of people who have defeated cancer, it’s great to have in your corner.”

Montgomery was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2010. He beat the disease, and he says that’s partly because doctors found it early.

“Hopefully one of these days, we’ll find that antidote, and we won’t ever have to mention it again,” he says. “I found it very, very early, and I’m 100 percent clean, green, rockin’.”

The soon-to-be Kentucky Music Hall of Fame inductees launched the Check Your Headlights campaign, corresponding with their single ‘Headlights,’ during October, which is Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

“I know when we heard ['Headlights'] for the first time, I looked at T … and I went, ‘That’s it right there,’” Montgomery says of the new tune. “That’s who we are, and that’s what we are. The production might be a little bit different, but it’s still … the same theme that we’ve always been.”

Adds Gentry, “It’s still the Montgomery Gentry signature sound to it.”

Montgomery Gentry, who signed with Blaster Records earlier this year, are preparing a new album for release in early 2015.

The Montgomery Gentry guys are, sadly, no strangers to cancer. But their experiences with the disease have made both Eddie Montgomery and Troy Gentry proponents of regular checkups to aid in early detection.

“Early detection [has a] 100 percent cure rate, so that’s the key,” says Gentry, whose wife Angie was recently diagnosed with breast cancer. She’s currently undergoing chemo, and her prognosis looks good, but Gentry tells The Boot that, no matter the stage, a cancer diagnosis is a lot to handle.

“It’s devastating just to hear the word cancer,” he says, “but with today’s technologies, medicines, all that, and having the support of people who have defeated cancer, it’s great to have in your corner.”

Montgomery was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2010. He beat the disease, and he says that’s partly because doctors found it early.

“Hopefully one of these days, we’ll find that antidote, and we won’t ever have to mention it again,” he says. “I found it very, very early, and I’m 100 percent clean, green, rockin’.”

The soon-to-be Kentucky Music Hall of Fame inductees launched the Check Your Headlights campaign, corresponding with their single ‘Headlights,’ during October, which is Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

“I know when we heard ['Headlights'] for the first time, I looked at T … and I went, ‘That’s it right there,’” Montgomery says of the new tune. “That’s who we are, and that’s what we are. The production might be a little bit different, but it’s still … the same theme that we’ve always been.”

Adds Gentry, “It’s still the Montgomery Gentry signature sound to it.”

Montgomery Gentry, who signed with Blaster Records earlier this year, are preparing a new album for release in early 2015.



Read More: Montgomery Gentry Talk Battling, Beating Cancer | http://theboot.com/montgomery-gentry-cancer/?trackback=tsmclip

Last Updated on Tuesday, 04 November 2014 22:33

Hits: 157

Kentucky Music Hall of Fame announces 2015 class

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Montgomery Gentry were announced  as part of the 2015 Kentucky Music Hall of Fame Class.
Photo by Frederick Breedon IV

Courtesy Examiner.com

On Wednesday afternoon, the Kentucky Music Hall of Fame announced its 2015 inductee class. An enthusiastic crowd awaited the announcement, which was conducted with Executive Director, Robert Lawson, as well as Halfway to Hazard.

Those to be inducted into the 2015 Kentucky Music Hall of Fame Class include Montgomery Gentry, Kevin Richardson and Brian Littrell of Backstreet Boys,  Larry Cordle, Clarence Spaulding, Pete Stamper, The Moonglows, and Doc Hopkins.

Eddie Montgomery and Troy Gentry of Montgomery Gentry got their start playing the honky tonks in central Kentucky. Both would explode into the country music scene with their hit song, "Hillbilly Shoes." The duo would gain hit singles over the years including "Where I Come From," "My Town," "Daddy Won't Sell the Farm," and "Speed," just to name a few. They continue to release new material and support Kentucky charities.

The Backstreet Boys received worldwide fame in the 1990s. They soared up the charts with hit songs "I Want It That Way," "Everybody," "Quit Playin' Games," and many more. Kevin Richardson and Brian Littrell have given back to their communities in central Kentucky over the year and always said they are proud to call Kentucky home.
Larry Cordle has been well known in the bluegrass and country music industry. Fans will recognize his song, "Murder on Music Row," that was made a hit thanks to George Strait and Alan Jackson. His songs have appeared on albums that have sold over 55 million from Garth Brooks, Trisha Yearwood, Reba McEntire, Ricky Skaggs, and more. He is well respected in the music industry and continues to perform with his band, Lonesome Standard Time.
Clarence Spaulding has been in the music industry managing bands over the years. He opened up a club in Lexington, Kentucky, working with artists such as Ray Charles, Lee Greenwood, and Janie Frickie. He hired Exile as the house band and soon became their road manager when they became successful. He helped manage different acts including KT Oslin, Lorrie Morgan, Eddie Rabbitt, and Brooks & Dunn. These days he works with Jason Aldean, Terri Clark, Rascal Flatts, and Kix Brooks.
You cannot think of Renfro Valley Entertainment Center and Barn Dance without thinking of the legendary Pete Stamper. The Korean War veteran has been a member of the Renfro Valley entertainers since 1950. He was a part of Red Foley's "Ozark Jubilee" television show, the Grand Ole Opry, and the "Porter Wagoner Show." At one time, he served as road manager to Dolly Parton. He also worked with Patsy Cline, Wanda Jackson, Jim Ed Brown, Jean Shepherd and more. He wrote the book, "It All Happened In Renfro Valley," which is available for purchase.
The Moonglows were a well-known r&b and doo wop group in the 1950s and 1960s. The original lineup from Louisville included Bobby Lester, Harvey Fuqua, Alexander Graves, and Prentiss Barnes, with guitarist Billy Johnson. They were originally called the Crazy Sounds, but were renamed by disc jockey Alan Freed as the Moonglows. They were successful on the charts with hit songs "Sincerely," "Most of All," We Go Together," "See Saw," and "Ten Commandments of Love." Their songs have appeared in several movies. The group would disband in the 1960s, but their sound would remain as a piece of r&b and vocal group history.
Born at the turn of the century in 1900 in Harlan County, Doc Hopkins would be known for playing banjo and singing on WLS National Barn Dance and the WJJD Supertime Frolic. He helped form the Cumberland Ridge Runners. He would play at folk festivals in the 60s and appeared at the National Folk Festival in 1982 as the oldest performer that year. Not only did he sing the songs, but he knew the story behind the songs.
Fans of Kentucky music history can take part of the Kentucky Music Hall of Fame induction ceremony on April 10, 2015, in Lexington, Ky. It will be held at the Lexington Convention Center and always highlights the life and times of each performer. The last few years have been with sellout crowds with proceeds going back to the Kentucky Music Hall of Fame.
Be sure to visit the Kentucky Music Hall of Fame in Renfro Valley. It is located less than a mile directly off of Exit 62 on I-75. The tremendous amount of work is reflected on the historical lesson one can get while looking through the exhibits. Check out www.kentuckymusicmuseum.com.

 

Last Updated on Thursday, 30 October 2014 14:12

Hits: 295

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